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Fractionation of fish protein hydrolysates by ultrafiltration and nanofiltration: impact on peptidic populations

TitreFractionation of fish protein hydrolysates by ultrafiltration and nanofiltration: impact on peptidic populations
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuteursBourseau, P, Vandanjon, L, Jaouen, P, Chaplain-Derouiniot, M, Masse, A, Guerard, F, Chabeaud, A, Fouchereau-Peron, M, Le Gal, Y, Ravallec-Ple, R, Berge, JP, Picot, L, Piot, JM, Batista, I, Thorkelsson, G, Delannoy, C, Jakobsen, G, Johansson, I
JournalDesalination
Volume244
Pagination303–320
ISSN0011-9164
Résumé

The production by enzymatic treatment of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) is a promising route to add value to fisheries proteinic co-products (fish frames, heads etc.). Indeed, FPH possess good nutritional properties and biological activities for food and feed uses. Pressure-driven membrane separations such as ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) can be used after the hydrolysis to, increase the specific activities of the FPH. This paper discusses the impact of a two-step UF/NF process producing four different fractions on two industrial FPH with different hydrolysis degrees. Fractionation is carried out in "realistic" conditions for an industrial process, on highly concentrated FPH solutions (about 100 g of dry matter/L) at a high volume reduction factor. For each step, UF or NF, the variation of the permeation flux in the course of the fractionation is discussed according to the FPH hydrolysis degree and the membranes cut-offs. The values of performance indicators defined in terms of nitrogen content are also examined, including the concentration factor (CF), the relative recovery in the retentate(eta(R)) and the mean and final retention factors (RFm and RFf). Computed values of these indicators are validated through the setting of volume and mass balances around each step. The impact of fractionation on the FPH peptidic population is shown. Peptidic populations are described in terms of chromatographic profiles (SEC-FPLC). The UF fractionation produces a permeate enriched with respect to the FPH smaller than a molecular weight of about 600-750 Dalton, and a retentate enriched in large peptides (above the same MW). A similar behaviour is found for the NF fractionation. Comparing the impact of the UF fractionation on the two hydrolysates allows to conclude that the membrane cut-off is well-suited when comprised between the MWs of the biggest and the most abundant peptides in the FPH.

DOI10.1016/j.desal.2008.05.026