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Sustained hydrostatic pressure tolerance of the shallow water shrimp Palaemonetes varians at different temperatures: insights into the colonisation of the deep sea.

TitreSustained hydrostatic pressure tolerance of the shallow water shrimp Palaemonetes varians at different temperatures: insights into the colonisation of the deep sea.
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuteursCottin, D, Brown, A, Oliphant, A, Mestre, NC, Ravaux, J, Shillito, B, Thatje, S
JournalComp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol
Volume162
Ticket4
Pagination357-63
Date Published2012 Aug
ISSN1531-4332
Mots-clésAcclimatization, Animals, Arthropod Proteins, Behavior, Animal, Cannibalism, Ecosystem, Gene Expression, HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins, Hydrostatic Pressure, Oceans and Seas, Palaemonidae, Stress, Physiological, Temperature
Résumé

We investigated the tolerance of adult specimens of the shallow-water shrimp Palaemonetes varians to sustained high hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa) across its thermal tolerance window (from 5 to 27 °C) using both behavioural (survival and activity) and molecular (hsp70 gene expression) approaches. To our knowledge, this paper reports the longest elevated hydrostatic pressure exposures ever performed on a shallow-water marine organism. Behavioural analysis showed a 100% survival rate of P. varians after 7 days at 10 MPa and 5 or 10 °C, whilst cannibalism was observed at elevated temperature (27 °C), suggesting no impairment of specific dynamic action. A significant interaction of pressure and temperature was observed for both behavioural and molecular responses. Elevated pressure was found to exacerbate the effect of temperature on the behaviour of the animals by reducing activity at low temperature and by increasing activity at high temperature. In contrast, only high pressure combined with low temperature increased the expression of hsp70 genes. We suggest that the impressive tolerance of P. varians to sustained elevated pressure may reflect the physiological capability of an ancestral species to colonise the deep sea. Our results also support the hypothesis that deep-sea colonisation may have occurred during geological periods of time when the oceanic water column was warm and vertically homogenous.

DOI10.1016/j.cbpa.2012.04.005
Alternate JournalComp. Biochem. Physiol., Part A Mol. Integr. Physiol.
Identifiant (ID) PubMed22537881